From the beginning there never was a secret, every mystery you have ever wondered about has been hidden in plain sight.

We are the Ātmeśvara Mārga School, and if we took ourselves seriously enough to have an "official" voice, this would be it. We are dedicated to the process of human integration, of moving from the segregated, mechanistic, conditioned state, to the Integrated, unconditioned state of the awake, adult human.

Friday, January 9, 2009

Context

One of the problems with dealing with a story like "Dance of the New Moon" is that such stories come from a particular cultural milieu, and without proper context some important aspects of such a story can remain opaque.

Here in the west, when someone says "Dervish exercise" or "Sufi Dance" the most common understanding is the "Turn" of the Mevlevi dervishes or the "Dances of Universal Peace" created by Sam Louis (ra).

In Central Asia, before the take-over by the USSR, Dervish exercises and Dances had a much broader context.

One of the things I noticed in reading the responses in the various places that "The Dance of the New Moon" has been published is that there is little understanding of Sufi exercises or the culture in which they developed.

To help with this very understandable problem I wanted to help give some context to the story, or at least around it.


Here is a video clip of Dervish Practice that shows very common pattern of movement.
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Here is a clip of one of G. I. Gurdjieff's exercises that is also to the point
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For those who like hunting mysteries I can also say that the monetary where the story took place was founded by the Tariqa (path) that took its lineage from Ahmet Yesevi.

Perhaps this will help just a bit.

1 comment:

Menduir said...

"One of the problems with dealing with a story like "Dance of the New Moon" is that such stories come from a particular cultural milieu, and without proper context some important aspects of such a story can remain opaque."

This reminds me of something I heard a few years ago, about how there was a fad when a lot of folks were going on vision quests trying to find their totem animals. I heard that the various Peoples for whom this was part of their culture just smiled, took the faddists' money and said "Go out into the desert." And no one ever explained to those folks that you can't have a true vision quest unless you've absorbed all of the background cultural information of the People in question. Sure, you can have hallucinations due to exposure and lack of food, but without that cultural grounding, they were just hallucinations.

May or may not be the same thing you were talking about, but the parallels are interesting.

~ Jas.